Benefits of Cinnamon



What is Cinnamon?

Cinnamon is a spice that is found from the bark of the Cinnamomum tree. It is often used to add spice to sweet treats, but can also be taken in supplement form. Cinnamon isn’t just a delicious spice, it also has numerous health benefits.

What are the Benefits of Cinnamon?

One of the main reasons people supplement with cinnamon is due to its ability to lower blood glucose levels and improve insulin sensitivity. This is an ideal combination for individuals who are pre-diabetic, insulin-resistant, or is a type 2 diabetic. Cinnamon is able to regulate blood sugar levels by inhibiting digestive enzymes that breakdown starches (carbohydrates), like alpha-glycosidase, pancreatic amylase, and sucrase. Reducing these enzymes decreases glucose release into circulation and insulin spikes. Furthermore, research also suggests that insulin may improve insulin functioning, thus improving insulin sensitivity.

Moreover, studies also suggest that cinnamon reduces oxidative damage, reduces microbial growth, reduces pro-inflammatory cytokines, and regulates blood cholesterol and total triglyceride levels. Here are some of the key benefits of cinnamon:

  • Improve blood glucose
  • Improve diabetes
  • Improve insulin resistance
  • Improve cholesterol levels
  • Reduce inflammation
  • Act as an anti-microbial
  • Act as an anti-oxidant

How Can You Supplement with Cinnamon?

Cinnamon can be supplemented in doses of 2-4 grams or 1/2-1 tsp per day.

Keto Cinnamon Recipes

You can take cinnamon as a supplement, or you can reap the benefits of cinnamon by adding it into delicious recipes. Here are some of our favorite keto cinnamon recipes:

Resources

1) Kirkham S, et al. The potential of cinnamon to reduce blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistanceDiabetes Obes Metab. (2009)

2) Imparl-Radosevich J, et al. Regulation of PTP-1 and insulin receptor kinase by fractions from cinnamon: implications for cinnamon regulation of insulin signallingHorm Res. (1998)




3) Broadhurst CL, Polansky MM, Anderson RA. Insulin-like biological activity of culinary and medicinal plant aqueous extracts in vitroJ Agric Food Chem. (2000)

4)  A Hydroxychalcone Derived from Cinnamon Functions as a Mimetic for Insulin in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

5) Mohamed Sham Shihabudeen H, Hansi Priscilla D, Thirumurugan K. Cinnamon extract inhibits α-glucosidase activity and dampens postprandial glucose excursion in diabetic ratsNutr Metab (Lond). (2011)